May 2010 - Posts

The Stream Insight team is coming to London and will be presenting at a SQL Social event on the 9th June.

Stream Insight is one of the exciting new features in SQL Server 2008 R2. There are numerous uses of Stream Insight one being Algorithmic Trading an exciting topic in the banking sector. For details of what Stream Insight is go to the teams blog http://blogs.msdn.com/streaminsight/archive/2010/04/22/rtm.aspx and follow some of the links.

For more details of the SQL Social event go to the website http://sqlsocial.com/Events.aspx

Places are limited so please register quick if you want to attend.

Microsoft will also be announcing a $10,000 competition whilst they are here so make sure you come along especially if you work in banking.

Make sure you register by going to  http://sqlsocial.com/Events.aspx

Posted by simonsabin | 1 comment(s)

I was asked the question today whether the master class that Paul and Kimberley are running next month  (http://www.regonline.co.uk/builder/site/tab1.aspx?EventID=860887 ) is relevant for someone that is a developer.

Yes yes yes yes.

Consider it like your favourite album, there might be some of the songs that you hate but the rest you love and a couple in particular you will listen to all the time. If you are a developer then you will find that some of the stuff around backs and recovery might not be 100% relevant but its stuff you should have an awareness of. The rest of the stuff is 100% relevant and you will get out things out of a session with Paul and Kimberly that you will use every week for the rest of your career.

So don’t delay get registering I hear they haven’t many places yet and so I’m not sure how much longer they are going to keep the discount I’ve arranged open.

So register today and use the “SKN” code for the best discount possible. Only £149 for a whole days training with these guys. If you had to get them in to work on your projects they would be charging at least 10 times that amount.

Posted by simonsabin | 1 comment(s)

Would people be interested in buying SQLBits DVDs with the videos from SQLBits? Any funds to help future events would be good so wonder if people would be interested given you can download them yourselves for free.

Posted by simonsabin | 7 comment(s)

My session for 24hrs of pass on High Performance functions will be starting at 11:00 GMT thats migdnight for folks in the UK.

To attend follow this link https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/8000181573/join?id=N5Q8S7&role=attend&pw=d2%28_KmN3r

The rest of the sessions can be found here http://www.sqlpass.org/24hours/2010/Sessions/ChronologicalOrder.aspx

So far the sessions have been great so no pressure :(

See you there in 4.5 hrs

We are planning the next SQLBits and it is likely to be the same format as SQLBits V with a training day and a paid Friday.

One of the very painful things I have to deal with is odd purchasing processes generally employed by large companies. Use of 3rd parties is the most painful of these, if you can avoid using them it makes our life much easier. We run SQLBits in our spare time and so spending hours dealing with 1 person’s booking is not good. Some people still haven’t paid for SQLBits V and that was 7 months ago.

We are probably going to be stricter this time about making sure people have paid before they are allowed to attend the paid for elements.

If you are contemplating coming to a future SQLBits I would therefore ask you to plan ahead. If SQLBits needs to be a registered supplier then please start that process now. We are happy to help with that process now as its always easier to do it now rather than later.

We are also considering only allowing payments with credit cards, no invoicing. Can you please let us know if you would have a problem with that, and if so what problems you would have.

The last SQLBits was the largest ever with almost 500 people in attendance. If the next one is as successful then you can imagine dealing with 500 payments is something that could potentially take up a lot of time.

If you have comments please let me know at accounts [at] sqlbits.com or using the contact form on my blog.

Thanks again for your support of SQLBits and I hope to see you at future SQLBits.

Simon

Posted by simonsabin | 3 comment(s)

Three years ago I wrote a blog post about my top 10 CV tips.

http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/simons/archive/2007/01/09/TOP-10-CV-Tips.aspx

The world has changed slightly since then and one item I would add is that if you are active on the forums, stack overflow etc then put a link to your profile. This is a great way for recruiters to see some of your knowledge and importantly how you respond and interact with people.

The latter is something that is crucial when employing someone but is very difficult to understand from an interview. My belief is that technology is the smaller part of recruiting someone, people can generally learn new technology, if they can’t then they shouldn’t be in IT, but inter personal skills are something that comes from within and isn’t changed easily.

If you’re not active on some form of online forum, I would strongly suggest you do. It is an amazing way to develop your skills of communication and analysis skills. You often have to be very patient and try and solve a problem with very little information. It develops your skills in understanding what you need to ask for to get the information you need.

So get online

http://stackoverflow.com

http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/

http://ask.sqlservercentral.com/

http://serverfault.com/

http://www.experts-exchange.com/

http://www.sqlteam.com/forums/

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-gb/categories

Posted by simonsabin | 1 comment(s)

Don’t forget there are 2 usergroup meetings in London this week.

The first is on service broker (by far the best but under used feature in SQL Server IMHO) and resource governor. This one is in Victoria on Wednesday http://sqlserverfaq.com/events/216/Service-Broker-Intro-Terminology-Design-Considerations-Monitoring-and-Controlling-Resources-in-SQL-Server-Resource-Governor-Data-Collector.aspx

Then on Thursday Hitatchi Consulting are hosting a BI evening on DAX in Powerpivot and a case study in high scale business intelligence for a new game JustCause2. This is on the South Bank by London Bridge http://sqlserverfaq.com/events/223/Business-Intelligence-Implementing-common-business-calcs-using-DAX-in-PowerPivot-Chris-Webb-Case-Study-on-how-to-deal-with-Metrics-on-high-data-volumes.aspx

I hope to see you at least one of these.

Posted by simonsabin | 1 comment(s)

Are you working with SQL, if so then attending a Paul Randal and Kimberly Tripp seminar is a must. The amount these guys know about SQL is just scary. Their life is so SQL that the last time I was having dinner at theirs they were arguing the severity levels of certain IO error codes. Talk about extreme.

Paul and Kimberly are running a Master class on the 17th June at the Radisson Edwardian Heathrow.

The normal price is a bargain at £249 + VAT. I’ve managed to negotiate a discount of £100 for my readers. So you can use the code SKN and will only pay £149 + VAT for spending the day with two of the most knowledgeable SQL people in the world.

To register for the Paul and Kimberly master class on the 17th June click here. Don’t forget to use the promotion code to get your discount


This is the agenda

Bridging the Gap Between Development and Production
Applications are commonly developed with little regard for how design choices will affect performance in production. This is often because developers don't realize the implications of their design on how SQL Server will be able to handle a high workload (e.g. blocking, fragmentation) and/or because there's no full-time trained DBA that can recognize production problems and help educate developers. The keynote sets the stage for the rest of the day. Discussing some of the issues that can arise, explaining how some can be avoided and highlighting some of the features in SQL 2008 that can help developers and DBAs make better use of SQL Server, and troubleshoot when things go wrong.

SQL Server Mythbusters
It's amazing how many myths and misconceptions have sprung up and persisted over the years about SQL Server - after many years helping people out on forums, newsgroups, and customer engagements, Paul and Kimberly have heard it all. Are there really non-logged operations? Can interrupting shrinks or rebuilds cause corruption? Can you override the server's MAXDOP setting? Will the server always do a table-scan to get a row count? Many myths lead to poor design choices and inappropriate maintenance practices so these are just a few of many, many myths that Paul and Kimberly will debunk in this fast-paced session on how SQL Server operates and should be managed and maintained.

Database Recovery Techniques Demo-Fest
Even if you have a disaster recovery strategy in place, you need to practice to make sure that your plan will work when a disaster does strike. In this fast-paced demo session Paul and Kimberly will repeatedly do nasty things to databases and then show how they are recovered - demonstrating many techniques you can use in production for disaster recovery. Not for the faint-hearted!

GUIDs: Use, Abuse, and How To Move Forward
Since the addition of the GUID (Microsoft’s implementation of the UUID), my life as a consultant and "tuner" has been busy. I’ve seen databases designed with GUID keys run fairly well with small workloads but completely fall over and fail because they just cannot scale. And, I know why GUIDs are chosen - it simplifies the handling of parent/child rows in your batches so you can reduce round-trips or avoid dealing with identity values. And, yes, sometimes it's even for distributed databases and/or security that GUIDs are chosen. I'm not entirely against ever using a GUID but overusing and abusing GUIDs just has to be stopped! Please, please, please let me give you better solutions and explanations on how to deal with your parent/child rows, round-trips and clustering keys!

Essential Database Maintenance
In this session, Paul and Kimberly will run you through their top-ten database maintenance recommendations, with a lot of tips and tricks along the way. These are distilled from almost 30 years combined experience working with SQL Server customers and are geared towards making your databases more performant, more available, and more easily managed (to save you time!). Everything in this session will be practical and applicable to a wide variety of databases. Topics covered include: backups, shrinks, fragmentation, statistics, and much more! Focus will be on 2005 but we'll explain some of the key
Bridging the Gap Between Development and Production
Applications are commonly developed with little regard for how design choices will affect performance in production. This is often because developers don't realize the implications of their design on how SQL Server will be able to handle a high workload (e.g. blocking, fragmentation) and/or because there's no full-time trained DBA that can recognize production problems and help educate developers. The keynote sets the stage for the rest of the day. Discussing some of the issues that can arise, explaining how some can be avoided and highlighting some of the features in SQL 2008 that can help developers and DBAs make better use of SQL Server, and troubleshoot when things go wrong.

SQL Server Mythbusters
It's amazing how many myths and misconceptions have sprung up and persisted over the years about SQL Server - after many years helping people out on forums, newsgroups, and customer engagements, Paul and Kimberly have heard it all. Are there really non-logged operations? Can interrupting shrinks or rebuilds cause corruption? Can you override the server's MAXDOP setting? Will the server always do a table-scan to get a row count? Many myths lead to poor design choices and inappropriate maintenance practices so these are just a few of many, many myths that Paul and Kimberly will debunk in this fast-paced session on how SQL Server operates and should be managed and maintained.

Database Recovery Techniques Demo-Fest
Even if you have a disaster recovery strategy in place, you need to practice to make sure that your plan will work when a disaster does strike. In this fast-paced demo session Paul and Kimberly will repeatedly do nasty things to databases and then show how they are recovered - demonstrating many techniques you can use in production for disaster recovery. Not for the faint-hearted!

GUIDs: Use, Abuse, and How To Move Forward
Since the addition of the GUID (Microsoft’s implementation of the UUID), my life as a consultant and "tuner" has been busy. I’ve seen databases designed with GUID keys run fairly well with small workloads but completely fall over and fail because they just cannot scale. And, I know why GUIDs are chosen - it simplifies the handling of parent/child rows in your batches so you can reduce round-trips or avoid dealing with identity values. And, yes, sometimes it's even for distributed databases and/or security that GUIDs are chosen. I'm not entirely against ever using a GUID but overusing and abusing GUIDs just has to be stopped! Please, please, please let me give you better solutions and explanations on how to deal with your parent/child rows, round-trips and clustering keys!

Essential Database Maintenance
In this session, Paul and Kimberly will run you through their top-ten database maintenance recommendations, with a lot of tips and tricks along the way. These are distilled from almost 30 years combined experience working with SQL Server customers and are geared towards making your databases more performant, more available, and more easily managed (to save you time!). Everything in this session will be practical and applicable to a wide variety of databases. Topics covered include: backups, shrinks, fragmentation, statistics, and much more! Focus will be on 2005 but we'll explain some of the key
Posted by simonsabin | 2 comment(s)

Just asking people not to use a list of certain words is not prevention from SQL Injection

https://homebank.sactocu.org/UA2004/faq-mfa.htm#pp6

To protect yourself from SQL Injection you have to do 1 simple thing.

Do not build your SQL statements by concatenating values passed by the user into a string an executing them.

If your query has to be dynamic then make sure any values passed by a user are passed as parameters and use sp_executesql in TSQL or a SqlCommand object in ADO.Net

An example of why the nonsense this back is spouting is the follows

declare

@s char(99);set @s=0x7072696E7420276E756D707469657320497665207363726577656420796F7572207365727665722720;exec(@s)

This is a single line of code that is < 140 characters doesn’t contain the word drop, delete or anything like that. Run it and see what you get (trust me it is safe)

 

Encase they change it here is the page

image

Posted by simonsabin | 4 comment(s)

If so then you may find the product key you have doesn’t enable all the functionality.

Looking at the list of what isn’t enabled its the collaboration stuff like workflow and publishing to libraries.

You can read more with the KB article http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/983473?p=1

Posted by simonsabin | 1 comment(s)